2017 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
Oral Sessions
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The Presenter of each paper is in BOLD type immediately following the paper title. Co-authors are then listed in parentheses. All abstracts in a session can be accessed using the Session Title link.
= presentation powerpoints

 

Monday / November 6 / 8:15 AM - 10:15 AM


CONFERENCE OPENING PLENARY SESSION


Welcome and Opening Remarks

Rafael E. Frias, III
President, American Water Resources Association
Black & Veatch Corp., Coral Springs, FL


Conference Co-Chairs and Technical Co-Chairs

Brenda O. Bateman
Conference Co-Chair
Oregon Water Resources Department
Salem, OR

Michael E. Campana
Conference Co-Chair
College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR

Keynote Speaker

Eric Quaempts
Connecting Community, Water Management, and Science
Director, Department of Natural Resources, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
Pendleton, OR

Aligning water management efforts with community values, while maintaining scientific integrity, is a challenge we all face—perhaps more now than in any time in recent history. In this keynote, Eric Quaempts presents a unique example of the Umatilla Tribe’s 10-year approach to achieve alignment, using a river vision not only inspired by tribal community traditional foods, but grounded in science. This graphics-rich keynote will set the stage for AWRA’s 2017 Annual Conference with a call for an increased commitment to science and a reminder that thoughtfully and closely relating our efforts to the communities we serve can strengthen not only our work but also stakeholder understanding and support.

Guest Speaker

Timothy Palmer
Wild and Scenic Rivers: An American Legacy
Award-winning Author and Photographer
Port Orford, OR

Historian and photographer Tim Palmer reveals the history and policy foundation of the federal wild and scenic program, which will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2018. Wild and Scenic Rivers: An American Legacy, published by Oregon State University Press, presents an illuminating portrait of the world's premier system for the protection of natural rivers. Tim is the author and photographer of 25 books about rivers, the environment, and adventure travel. As an historian, writer, citizen conservationist, and former environmental planner, he has been involved in the wild and scenic rivers system since its founding. See his work at www.timpalmer.org

Monday / Nov. 6 / 10:45 AM - 12:00 Noon

Plenary Lightning Talks

Lightning Talks are becoming a staple of the AWRA annual conference experience. This session is designed to "preview" many of the presentations in this year's conference and features brief, 5-minute 'teasers' for upcoming talks and events. Where applicable, the session number for the full presentation is shown in parentheses.

1) The Watershed Connectivity Banquet: Do Citizen Scientists Have a Seat at the Table? - Alan Kolok, Nebraska Watershed Network, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE (Session 41)

Powerpoint 2) Perspectives on Water Scarcity and Abundance - Sharon B. Megdal, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

3) Panel: California Water: Winning with the WIN Act? Betsy A. Cody, Arlington, VA (Session 13)

4) Exploring the Water-Climate-Population Nexus with a Streamlined Stochastic Model - Sean W. Fleming, White Rabbit Consulting LLC, Corvallis, OR (Session 8)

5) Improving Watershed Health through the Watershed Condition Framework: The Role of National Forest Lands - Kelly Mott Lacroix, U.S. Forest Service, Washington, DC (Session 70)

6) Improving Resilience & Livability with Green Infrastructure in Historic New Orleans - Jason C. Doll, Moffatt & Nichol, Raleigh, NC (Session 57)

7) Integrating Land Use and Water Resources: Planning to Support Water Supply Diversification - Becky Fedak, Brendle Group, Denver, CO (Session 14)

8) Prioritizing Water Resources Projects for Implementation in the 10 Year Planning Process - Claire Bleser, Riley-Purgatory-Bluff Creek Watershed District, Chanhassen, MN (Session 4)

9) National Water Center Innovators Program: Summer Institute - Jerad Bales, CUAHSI, Cambridge, MA

10) Policy and Infrastructure for Flood Hazard and Floodplain Management - Samantha Hamlin, Portland State University, Portland, OR (Session 43)

11) The Law of Water in a Time of Change: Pacific Northwestern States Facing Growing Populations, Conflicting Needs, and Changing Conditions. Can the Law Adapt? - Lara B. Fowler, Penn State University, University Park, PA (Session 29)

12) Considering Climatic Uncertainty on Groundwater Remediation and Restoration - Scott D. Warner, Ramboll Environ, Emeryville, CA (Session 8)

13) Using a Local Political Action Project to Control Fishery-Generated Soft Plastic Debris on the Turtle Nesting Beaches of Florida's South-Eastern Coast - Faith Maniti, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach, FL (Session 46)


Technical Track Preview

There are five Technical Session Tracks that run throughout the conference: Technology, Flowing Waters, Future Risk, Policy-IWRM (Integrated Water Resources Management) and Miscellaneous Topics. Additionally, there are 5 sessions in a category “The Road to Brasilia: Preparation for the 8th World Water Forum”. The 8th World Water Forum (8WWF) will convene in March 2018 in Brazil and AWRA will be involved in developing discussions and presentations in the areas of water and energy; climate change adaptation; and integrated water resources management. These designated sessions (8, 19, 14, 19 and 23) at the 2017 Portland Annual Conference reflect AWRA's areas of involvement at 8WWF.


 

The Presenter of each paper is in BOLD type immediately following the paper title. Co-authors are then listed in parentheses. All abstracts in a session can be accessed using the Session Title link.


Monday / Nov. 6 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Moderator - David Blodgett
U.S. Geological Survey, Middleton, WI

Powerpoint
Multiple Presentations (90MB)

David Lampert, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK
A Python Environment for Automated Integration of Hydrologic Data into Watershed Models
Michael Lilly, Geo-Watershed Scientific, Fairbanks, AK
Use of Simple Animated Graphics for On-Line Water-Resources Information
Lauren Patterson, Duke University, Durham, NC
Internet of Water: Sharing and Integrating Water Data for Sustainability
Greg Gearheart, California Water Boards, Sacramento, CA
Regulatory Performance Outputs and an Emerging Contaminant Data Story - California Water Boards
Jared Bales, CUAHSI, Cambridge, MA
Volunteer Monitoring: Supporting Data Sharing and Discovery
Levi Brekke, Bureau of Reclamantion, Denver, CO
Reclamation Open Water Data Initiative (OWDI) Activities
Ariel Doumbouya, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO
USGS, VisibilityFliter: Multi-Scale Hydrography Representation in the NHD and NHDPlus HR
David Gochis, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO
The NOAA National Water Model: Model Structure, Data Flow and Summary Results
David Blodgett, U.S. Geological Survey, Madison, WI
There's a New International Standard for, "What is a Watershed?" And You Should Know About It!
David Arctur, University of Texas, Austin, TX
A Flood of Data: The National Water Model, the Texas Flood Response System, and Hurricane Harvey

This session will feature short presentations highlighting recent advances and exciting projects in hydro informatics and modeling. These short lightning talks are an opportunity to get a quick overview of informatics topics from other AWRA members. Topics will include web technologies, data management tools, data analysis and visualization capabilities, novel modeling and decision support systems, and more.

Moderator - DeEtta Fosbury
GSI Water Solutions, Portland, OR

Topical Session: Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) is an effective water management tool that involves storing water underground when water is plentiful and then pumping it out when needed. Many municipalities in the Pacific Northwest have used ASR to help meet peak demand when the primary source of drinking water supply is limited or is too costly at peak delivery rates. This session presents ASR permitting approaches in Washington State, case studies of three municipal programs that are atypical in their approach to ASR, and one Oregon case study that highlights small-scale use of ASR to augment domestic water supplies in rural areas.

Powerpoint Policy, Permitting & the Particulars of Aquifer Storage and Recovery in Washington State - Melissa Downes, WA State Dept of Ecology, Union Gap, WA, USA
Powerpoint City of Yakima Aquifer Storage and Recovery Program: Supplying Municipal Demand in the Face of Climate Change - David Brown, City of Yakima, Yakima, WA, USA (co-author: A. Austreng)
Maximizing Beneficial Use of a Spring Source for Municipal Supply - City of Lafayette ASR Program - Kenny Janssen, GSI Water Solutions, Inc., Portland, OR, USA
City of Othello Aquifer Storage and Recovery Program: Addressing Municipal Water Supply Needs in the Columbia Plateau - Andrew Austreng, Aspect Consulting, LLC, Seattle, WA, USA (co-author: T. Flynn)
Domestic Well Aquifer Storage and Recovery Using Seasonal Springs - Julianne Robinson, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA (co-authors: T. Jarvis, D. Tullos)

Moderator - Lisa Beutler
Stantec, Sacramento, CA

Permanent Water Solution for 'Ground Zero of the Drought' in California - Satya Gala, GEI Consultants, Rancho Cordova, CA, USA (co-author: S. Doe)
Meeting the Drinking Water Needs of Disadvantaged Communities During California's Drought - Maria Herrera, Self-Help Enterprises, Visalia, CA, USA
State Assistance to Disadvantaged Communities During California's Historic Drought - Joe Karkoski, State Water Resources Control Board, Sacramento, CA, USA

Moderator - Harmony Burright
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem OR

Prioritizing Water Resources Projects for Implementation in the 10 Year Planning Process - Claire Bleser, Riley-Purgatory-Bluff Creek Watershed District, Chanhassen, MN, USA (co-authors: E. Anderson Wenz, S. Sobiech, G. Williams)
A New Era of Water Planning: Fostering Place-Based, Collaborative, Integrated Approaches - Harmony Burright, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR, USA (co-author: S. Parrett)
PowerpointThe Palouse Basin - A Relatively Successful Model for Collaborative Water Management - Paul Kimmell, Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee, Pullman, WA, USA (co-author: K. Woodley)
Working With Partners and Stakeholders to Protect Water Resources as Growth Occurs - Denise Kalakay, Lane Council of Governments, Eugene, OR, USA (co-author: J. Callister)

Moderator - Parker J. Wigington
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Redding, CA

Jim Wigington, JAWRA Editor-in-Chief, will present insights and practical steps to successfully publishing in water-related technical journals. Topics will include: defining the scope and content of a paper, who should be an author or coauthor, selecting a journal, effective writing, wise use of figures and tables, navigating the peer review process, and ways to make your journal article more visible. Ample time will be allotted for discussion of these and related topics.

Monday / Nov. 6 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Moderator - David Blodgett
U.S. Geological Survey, Middleton, WI

Powerpoint
Multiple Presentations (90MB)

Michael Gallagher, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA
The Most Influential Environmental Photograph Ever Taken and the Story Behind it.
Keith Bellingham, Stevens Water Monitoring Systems, Portland, OR
Advances in Meteorological and Hydrological Data Acquisition Using Cloud Computing
Michael Lilly, Geo-Watershed Scientific, Fairbanks, AK
Cameras for Long Term Visual Monitoring
Ken Smith, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR
How the Oregon Water Resources Department Uses the National Hydrologic Dataset to Route Water Rights
Tara Moran, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Evaluating the Development of a Multi-Agency Data Platform System for Real-Time River Operation Decisions
Kim Quesnel, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Smart meters: An Overview, Potential Benefits, and Overcoming Challenges

Joshua Benjamin, University of Florida, Ocala, FL
Laser-Based Water Level Sensing: Seeing the Unseen
Adam Irrer, E&J Gallo Winery, Modesto, CA
Taking a Big Data Approach to Vineyard Irrigation Management
Levi Brekke, Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO
Reclamation R&D to Advance Real-Time Data Collection and Dissemination Technologies
Al Rea, U.S. Geological Survey, Boise, ID
NHDPlus High Resolution Beta Quality Control: How You Can Participate
Steve Kopp, Esri, Redlands, CA
Drones for Water Resources Mapping - Above and Below the Water

This session will feature short presentations highlighting recent advances and exciting new capabilities in data collection technology. These short lightning talks are an opportunity to get a quick overview of informatics topics from other AWRA members. Topics will include new field computing applications, new sensor technologies, novel data management and telemetry applications, and more.

Moderator - Sharon Megdal
The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

PowerpointOn the Challenges of Gaining a Comprehensive Understanding of U.S. Groundwater Governance and Management - Sharon Megdal, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
Grand Theft Groundwater? The Groundbreaking Mississippi v. Tennessee U.S. Supreme Court Case - Michael Campana, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA (co-author: H. A. Mondo)
Southern (Ground)Water Woes: Transboundary Groundwater Governance of the Memphis Sand Aquifer - Holly Mondo, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA (co-author: M.E. Campana)
California and the New Groundwater Sheriff - Lisa Beutler, Stantec, Sacramento, CA, USA

Moderator - Scott Warner
Ramboll Environ, Emeryville, CA

Considering Climatic Uncertainty on Groundwater Remediation and Restoration - Scott Warner, Ramboll Environ, Emeryville, CA, USA (co-author: D. Rowe)
Discerning a Climate-Change Control on Declining Summer River Flows: The Relative Influences of Changes in Water Demands, Water Sources, and Watershed Hydrology - John Porcello, GSI Water Solutions, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: W. Burt, J. Gorski)
Exploring the Water-Climate-Population Nexus with a Streamlined Stochastic Model - Sean Fleming, White Rabbit R&D LLC, Corvallis, OR, USA

Moderator - Alyssa Mucken
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

Panelists:
Jay Jasperse, Sonoma County Water Agency, Santa Rosa, CA
Powerpoint Jennifer L. Verleger, North Dakota Office of Attorney General, Bismarck, ND
Alyssa Mucken, Integrated Water Resources Strategy, Salem, OR

As states and local water managers grapple with a limited and changing water supply, improving reservoir management and operations has become an even more important water management strategy. Many federal reservoir projects developed by the U.S Army Corps of Engineers were built primarily for flood control; however, it's not uncommon for such projects to be authorized for other uses, such as irrigation, water supply, hydropower, recreation, water quality, and fish and wildlife. In recent years, several states and local agencies have been looking for ways to better balance flood control and water supply needs. This panel presentation will touch upon the science, management, and legal underpinnings of accessing water behind federal storage projects. Speakers will cover efforts to test 'Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations' at Lake Mendocino in California, Oregon's efforts to evaluate the feasibility of reallocating federally stored water in the state's most populated river basin, and the challenges facing North Dakota as it tries to access natural flows within federal projects in the Missouri River basin.

Moderator - May Wu
Argonne National Laboratory, Lamont, IL

Water Quality Evaluation for Agricultural Management Practices on Producing Bioenergy in Upper Mississippi River Tributary Basin - Miae Ha, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, USA (co-author: M. Wu)
WATER (Water Analysis Tool for Energy Resources) - A Water Impact Assessment Model Framework for Bioenergy and Agriculture - May Wu, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, USA (co-authors: M. Ha, H. Xu)
Cost Benefit Analysis and Public Review of Cooling Water Sources for a Co-Generation Power Plant: A Case Study of the TVA Co-Gen Plant in Memphis, TN - Courtney van Stolk, Oregon State University, Germantown, TN, USA
Integrating Water Quantity to Life Cycle Assessment: A US-Based Energy-Water Nexus Case Study - Emily Grubert, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA


Tuesday / Nov. 7 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Moderator - Jerad Bales
CUAHSI-Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Inc., Cambridge, MA

Topical Session: This session will present the findings from a recent Aspen Data Dialogue report: INTERNET OF WATER: Sharing and Integrating Water Data for Sustainability. Currently, we are unable to answer fundamental questions about the quantity, quality, and use of water systems in a timely way. The data often exist to answer these questions, but are not open or easily shared across platforms. Just as the internet links together people, news, information, ideas, etc. with near instantaneous speed, the "Internet of Water" would ideally enable the connection and transmission of water-related data and information between regional data sharing communities in real-time. Just as the internet revolutionized society by passing information between individuals, connecting water data across agencies and sectors will do no less than revolutionize how water resources are being managed; being better situated to address prevalent water problems from extreme flooding, to scarcity, to contamination, to restoring aquatic systems. In this session Lauren Patterson will provide an overview of the Aspen findings, Kelly Bennett will describe the value of open data from the user perspective, Greg Gearheart will share about California's role as a data producer and data sharing community, and Sara Larson will talk about the Water Data Exchange (WaDE) role to share and integrate data on water use across western states.

PowerpointA National Framework for Sharing and Integrating Water Data for Sustainability - Lauren Patterson, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, Duke Univ., Durham, NC, USA (co-authors: M. Doyle, K. King, D. Monsma)
The Value of Value Add: When Open Data Meets the Private Sector - Kelly Bennett, Water Sage, Denver, CO, USA
Making Water Data Flow Uphill: Transforming a State Water Agency to be Data Driven - Greg Gearheart, CA State Water Boards, Sacramento, CA, USA
WaDE: A State Agency Data-Sharing Platform Supporting Open Data Principles - Tony Willardson, Western States Water Council, Murray, UT, USA (co-author: S. Larsen)

Moderator - Marshall Gannett
U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR

Topical Session: Groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) are hot spots of biodiversity, exhibiting high species richness relative to the surrounding landscape, particularly in arid regions. In general, groundwater systems supporting GDEs are less studied, and with fewer institutional and regulatory protections, than those supporting human needs such as irrigation and municipal water supply. This session is intended to explore the hydrogeology, ecology, and management of GDEs, with the intent of fostering future communication between scientists and resource managers.

Groundwater-Dependent Wetlands on National Forests: Findings from Recent Inventories - Kathleen Dwire, USDA Forest Service, Fort Collins, CO, USA (co-authors: G. P. Jones, J. T. Gurrieri, C. Carlson)
Balancing Groundwater for Nature and People: a Case Study from the Oregon Dunes - Allison Aldous, The Nature Conservancy, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: R. Congdon, E. Blevins, Z. Freed)
PowerpointA Regional Aquifer Recharge Network to Support Baseflows, Flood Flows, and Groundwater Levels of the San Pedro River Ecosystem - Brooke Bushman, The Nature Conservancy, Tucson, AZ, USA (co-author: H. Richter)
Aquifer Recharge in a Bi-State Alluvial Fan System - Brian Wolcott, Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council, Milton-Freewater, OR, USA (co-authors: S. Patten, T. Baker, J. Scherberg, J. Keller)

Panel Facilitator - Betsy A. Cody, Water Resources Consultant, Arlington, Virginia
Moderator - Charlie V. Sterns, Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC

Panelists:
Christopher Kearney, The Ferguson Group, Washington, DC
Roger Patterson, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Michelle (Shelley) Ostrowski, Westlands Water District, Fresno, CA
Glen H. Spain, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations and the Institute for Fisheries Resources, Eugene, OR
David Murillo, Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region, Sacramento, CA

California has been on a roller coaster ride of long-term extreme drought followed by one of the wettest winters on record. Faced with severe to exceptional drought in much of the state during a recent five-year drought and regulatory restrictions on water project pumping, many water users called on Congress to change the way that the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) operates its Central Valley Project (CVP). After multiple years of negotiation and several legislative attempts, Congress in December 2016 passed the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (P.L. 114-322). The WIIN Act included provisions aimed at improving or 'maximizing' CVP water supplies while also protecting endangered species (Subtitle J - California Water). The Act also included significant changes to Reclamation project policies, including an early repayment provision and blanket authority for construction of projects proposed by state and local entities, with new cost-share requirements. This panel will discuss the first year implementation of the WIIN California Water statute: its successes, lessons learned from the 2017 water year, and reflections on possible outcomes for the 2018 water year (Oct. 1, 2017 - Sept. 30, 2018), including what information water managers need from water resource scientists, engineers and academics to balance competing water management objectives.

Moderator - Katie Henderson
Water Research Foundation, Denver, CO

Topical Session: In 2014, the Water Research Foundation established a Focus Area program titled, "Integrated Water Management: Planning for Future Water Supplies," and each year has funded 1-2 projects to enhance water utility implementation of IWM and improve water supply planning to be more integrated, resilient, and reliable. This session will highlight some of the outcomes from this Focus Area and other research initiatives, including: evaluating the treatability of alternative water sources; balancing cost with reliability, resilience, and sustainability in supply planning; integrating land use and water supply planning; and incentivizing green infrastructure.

Source Water Quality Requirements for Conventional Treatment of Stormwater, Graywater, and Treated Wastewater for Potable Reuse - Christopher Hill, Arcadis, Tampa, FL, USA (co-authors: D. Owen, S. Trussell, K. Thompson)
PowerpointA New Water Research Foundation Framework for Integrated Water Resources Planning - Neil Stewart, Stantec, Denver, CO, USA (co-authors: C. Paulson, K. Henderson, M. Badruzzaman)
Integrating Land Use and Water Resources: Planning to Support Water Supply Diversification - Becky Fedak, Brendle Group, Denver, CO, USA (co-author: K. Davis Henderson)
Green Infrastructure Incentive Programs for Private Property Owners: Lessons Learned - Janet Clements, Corona Environmental Consulting, Louisville, CO, USA (co-authors: J. Henderson, R. Sands, B. Fedak)

Moderator - Lyndsey Yasarer
USDA-ARS, Oxford, MS

Representation and Development of Lakes for the National Water Model - Laura K. Read, NCAR, Boulder, CO, USA (co-authors: D. N. Yates, K. Sampson, F. Salas, D. J. Gochis)
Linking Landscape Processes to Lake Water Quality with the Integrated AnnAGNPS Watershed Model and the CCHE-WQ Water Body Model - Lindsey Yasarer, USDA-ARS, Oxford, MS, USA (co-authors: R. L. Bingner, X. Chao, R. E. Lizotte, Jr., M. A. Locke)
Tidal Habitat Restoration at the Ravenswood Ponds, South San Francisco Bay - Latha Chandrasekaran, AECOM, Oakland, CA, USA (co-authors: J. Gambino, J. Bourgeois)

Tuesday / Nov. 7 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

Moderator - David Gilbey
Aquatic Informatics, McMinnville, OR

PowerpointHydrologic Features Standardization and the Environmental Linked Features Interoperability Experiment - David Blodgett, U.S. Geological Survey, Middleton, WI, USA (co-authors: I. Dornblut, B. Cochrane)
Evaluating the Development of Data Platforms for Improved Water Management Decisions - Tara Moran, Stanford Universtiy, Stanford, CA, USA (co-authors: L. Szeptycki, J. Martinez, E. Conrad, B. Thompson, Z. Sugg)
Decisions, Decisions: Decision Support Modeling in Groundwater Sustainability Planning - Ryan Thacher, Exponent, Pasadena, CA, USA (co-authors: A. Mead, S. C. Paulsen, M. Henrion)
Multi-Objective Robust Decision Making: IWRM Transferability from a Colorado Municipality to Colorado River Basin Level Planning - Leon Basdekas, Black & Veatch, Denver, CO, USA (co-authors: P. Reed, D. Yates)
Considerations for Developing Water Resilience on Army Installations - Elisabeth Jenicek, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL, USA (co-authors: N. Garfinkle, M. Kodack)

Moderator - Marshall Gannett
U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR

Topical Session: Groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) are hot spots of biodiversity, exhibiting high species richness relative to the surrounding landscape, particularly in arid regions. In general, groundwater systems supporting GDEs are less studied, and with fewer institutional and regulatory protections, than those supporting human needs such as irrigation and municipal water supply. This session is intended to explore the hydrogeology, ecology, and management of GDEs, with the intent of fostering future communication between scientists and resource managers.

California's Sustainable Groundwater Management Act: Protections for GDEs - Sandi Matsumoto, The Nature Conservancy, Sacramento, CA, USA (co-authors: K. Klausmeyer, M. Rohde, J. Howard)
Balancing Bovines and Bryophytes: Retrofitting Spring Developments to Protect Groundwater-Dependent Ecosystems - Zach Freed, The Nature Conservancy, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: A. Aldous, A. Gray, D. Wewer)
The Effects of Flow-System Scale on the Climate Sensitivity of Groundwater-Dependent Ecosystems in Central Oregon - Marshall Gannett, U.S. Geological Survey, Oregon Water Science Center, Portland, OR, USA

Moderator - Andrew Graham
HDR, Inc., Olympia, WA

Topical Session: It has been said that the prior appropriation system -- the doctrine of first in time, first in right -- is the American West's first drought plan. Over time, the economic and environmental implications of this doctrine have led governments and water users to seek to soften drought's impacts. This session will feature state officials from Oregon and Washington, who will explain their state's drought planning and response frameworks, and also speakers from Wyoming and Nevada, who will discuss basin-specific drought response efforts in the Upper Colorado/Green River Basin and Truckee-Carson River Systems.

Drought Contingency Planning in the Upper Colorado River Basin - Steve Wolff, Wyoming State Engineer's Office, Cheyenne, WY, USA
Drought Contingency Planning in Washington State - Jeff Marti, WA Dept of Ecology, Olympia, WA, USA
Drought Planning in Oregon - Alyssa Mucken, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR, USA
PowerpointAdapting to Variable Water Supply in the Truckee-Carson River System, Western USA - Kelley Sterle, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV, USA (co-author: L. Singletary)
Responding to California's Drought and Preparing for the Next - John Woodling, Regional Water Authority, Citrus Heights, CA, USA

Moderator - John Tracy
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

The Nexus between River Regulation and Groundwater Sustainability - John Tracy, TWRI-AgriLife Research, College Station, TX, USA (co-author: J. Johnson)
Integrated Water Resource Management for Sustainable Production in Zhuoshui River Watershed, Taiwan - Ming-Huang Wang, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, USA (co-authors: P. Tseng, P. Chiang, M. Wu)
Setting Conditions for Success of IWRM - Mike Antos, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority, Riverside, CA, USA (co-author: A. Zoller)
The Icicle Strategy: Using Collaborative Water Resource Planning, Policy, and Science to Adapt to Future Climate Change Conditions in Chelan County - Mike Kaputa, Chelan County Natural Resources, Wenatchee, WA (co-author: M. Downes)

Moderator - Michael Gallagher
WA State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA

Collaborative Aquatic Restoration in the Upper Klamath Basin - Heather Hendrixson, The Nature Conservancy, Klamath Falls, OR, USA
PowerpointImproving Multi-Objective Ecological Flow Management with Flexible Priorities and Turn-Taking: A Case Study from the Sacramento River Basin and San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary - Clint Alexander, ESSA Technologies Ltd., Vancouver, BC, Canada
Predicting Hydrologic Function with the Streamwater Mirco-Biome: A Case Study in 'Genohydrology' - Stephen Good, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA (co-authors: D. Urykri, B. Crump)
Managing Water Supply in Washington's 'Blue Hole' - the First 4 Years of Implementing the Dungeness Instream Flow Regulation - Michael Gallagher, WA State Dept of Ecology, Olympia, WA, USA

Tuesday / Nov. 7 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

Moderator - Bob Harmon
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

What Comes After NHDPlus HR Beta? Supporting Refresh Through Markup and QC - Ariel Doumbouya, US Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO, USA
USGS National Hydrography Mapping: Current and Future Direction of Datasets, Services and Systems - Becci Anderson, US Geological Survey, Anchorage, AK, USA
The National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus) - Alan Rea, US Geological Survey, Boise, ID, USA (co-authors: R. Anderson, A. Doumbouya)
Towards Vertical Integration of the Watershed Boundary Dataset with NHDPlus High Resolution - Susan Buto, US Geological Survey, Carson City, NV, USA

Moderator - Scott Kudlas
Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, Richmond, VA

Changes in Water Level, River Flow and Water Temperature on the Lower Columbia River, 1853-Present - Stefan Talke, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: D. A Jay, L. Helaire, D. Mahedy)
Kerry Island Tidal Restoration Project - Matt Cox, Inter-Fluve, Hood River, OR, USA (co-author: C. Alcott)
Effects of a Decrease in Salinity due to a Storm Surge on Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Tidal Salt Marsh Soils - Margaret Capooci, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (co-authors: J. Barba, R. Vargas)
Contrast Impacts of Land Reclamations in Bay Mouth and Head of Semi-Enclosed Bay Using an Idealized Bay and the Deep Bay, Pearl River Estuary, China - Ye Yang, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (co-authors: T. Fong, M. Chui)

Moderator - David Lampert
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK

Analysis of Future Flood Risks Associated With Climate Change on Oklahoma City Infrastructure - David Lampert, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA (co-authors: J. Furtado, K. Karleskint, M. Moursy, C. Dyson)
Charting a Course for Coastal Climate Change Adaptation in Canada - Natascia Tamburello, ESSA Technologies, Vancouver, BC, Canada (co-authors: M. Nelitz, J. Eyzaguirre, E. Olson, C. Cranmer)
Mentoring Philippine Water Districts on Development of Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments - Maurice Tobon, Tobon Engineering, Coral Springs, FL, USA (co-author: C. Pettit)

Moderator - Karen Trebitz
University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

The Legacy of Lead Mining in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin: Web Applications for Stakeholder Education, Engagement, and Decision-Making - Karen Trebitz, University of Idhao, Moscow, ID, USA (co-authors: V. A. Suchar, A. Odell, R. Lew, T. Elder, M. Wiest)
Appalachia as National Environmental Sacrifice Area: How Decades of Natural Resource Extraction and Failed Restoration Requirements Have Destroyed Surface and Groundwater Resources - Eric Fitch, Marietta College, Marietta, OH, USA

Moderator - Esther Conrad
Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Putting Adaptive Management into Practice: Incorporating Metrics and Action Triggers into Sustainable Groundwater Management - Esther Conrad, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA (co-authors: T. Moran, I. Crankshaw, J. Martinez, B. Blomquist, L. Szeptycki)
PowerpointReflections on the Use of Adaptive Management in an Increasingly Noisy and Complicated World - Clint Alexander, ESSA Technologies Ltd, Vancouver, BC, Canada (co-authors: M. Nelitz, D.Marmorek, C. Alexander, C. Murray, L. Greig)
Tools for Implementing an Adaptive Management Approach to Nutrient Source Control--A Focus on New Mexico - Gregory Currey, Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA, USA (co-authors: J. Brundage, S. Geil, S. Lemon, C. Meehan)
Reconciling Invasive Plant Management and Food Webs - Erin Donley Marineau, USDA ARS, Albany, CA, USA (co-authors: M. J. Perryman, R. K. Hartman, S. P. Lawler, P. D. Pratt)

Tuesday / Nov. 7 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 26, 27, 28, 29, 30

Moderator - Justin Huntington
Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV

Topical Session: Presenters will describe current approaches to estimate evapotranspiration (ET), a critical component of the global water cycle and the primary determinant of irrigation water requirements. Learn about innovative research aimed at improving ground-based ET measurements using cost effective laser technology, computational approaches, and artificial neural networks. Ongoing efforts in Oregon are applying remote sensing data and field observations to estimate ET for crop water demand and regional water budget modeling applications.

PowerpointComparison of Methods to Estimate Irrigation Water Requirements and Evapotranspiration in a Basin Study - Harney Basin Test Case - Jordan Beamer, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR, USA (co-author: J. Huntington)
Measuring Site Specific ET using Neural Networks - Jason Kelley, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA (co-authors: C. Higgins, T. Vagher, W. Walker)
Improving Groundwater Discharge Estimates in Oregon's Harney Basin - Amanda Garcia, US Geological Survey, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: S. B. Gingerich, H. Johnson, G. B. Senay)
Development of a Laser-Based Water Level Sensor for Fine-Scale Ecohydrological Measurements - Joshua Benjamin, University of Florida, Ocala, FL, USA (co-author: D. Kaplan)

Moderator - Eric Quaempts and Teara Farrow-Ferman
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR

Topical Session: Unlike most other natural resource managers, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) has adopted a mission based on the First Foods ritualistically served at tribal meals. This framework for natural resource management seeks to reflect the unique tribal values associated with natural resources and to emphasize ecological processes and services that are often undervalued by westernized Euro-American natural resource strategies. Underscoring the importance of Tribal values, in 2007 the CTUIR lead an effort to create a target vision for the Umatilla River. The River Vision describes healthy Umatilla River that is highly dynamic and shaped by not only physical and biological processes but also interactions and interconnections among those processes. Such a vision requires that managers incorporate several attributes of the Umatilla River into management and restoration strategies. We discuss our experiences of nearly 10 years, implementing the Umatilla River Vision across rivers in NE Oregon and SW Washington.

First Foods and the River Vision - Eric Quaempts, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservtion, Pendleton, OR, USA (co-authors: S. O'Daniel, T. Farrow-Ferman)
Aquatic Biota Response to Stream Restoration in the Upper Grand Ronde Basin, Oregon, USA - Les Naylor, CTUIR-Fisheries, Pendleton, OR, USA
Data Management and Web Communications to Inform Decision Making - Stacy Schumacher, CTUIR, Pendleton, OR, USA
Extending the River Vision: Incorporating Temporal Patterns of Hyporheic Exchange into River Management - Scott O'Daniel, CTUIR, Pendleton, OR, USA (co-authors: G.C. Poole, S.K. Fogg, S.P. Carlson, A.M. Reinhold)
Fish Habitat and Floodplain Restoration on Catherine Creek in the Upper Grande Ronde Watershed, Snake River Basin, Oregon, USA - Allen Childs, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR, USA

Moderator - Venki Uddameri
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX

Underrstanding Aquifer Response to Climate Change - Venki Uddameri, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA (co-authors: A. Hernandez, S. Singraju)
The Drought is Over: Now What? - Suzanne Dallman, California State University - Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, USA
What Actually Happened? Oregon's 2015 Drought and Lessons Learned in Impacts Reporting - Rianne BeCraft, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA
How Do We Build Drought Resilient Drinking Water Systems? Learning from California Utilities' Drought Responses - Amanda Fencl, UC Davis, Davis, CA, USA (co-authors: J. Ekstrom, M. Lubell)

Moderator - Laurel Stadjuhar
West Sage Water Consultants, Denver, CO

The Challenges and Opportunities Water Agencies Face as Their Roles in Water Management Expand and Evolve - Kim Ogren, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR, USA
Water Law in the Wild, Wild West: Water is for Fighting Over, Or Is It? - Laurel Stadjuhar, West Sage Water Consultants, Denver, CO, USA
The Law of Water in a Time of Change: Pacific Northwestern States Facing Growing Populations, Conflicting Needs, and Changing Conditions. Can the Law Adapt? - Lara B. Fowler, Penn State University, University Park, PA, USA (co-author: R. T. Caccese)
Fostering Agency Coordination to Ensure a More Sustainable Water Future for Hawai'i - Aida Arik, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, USA (co-authors: G. Chun, K. Burnett, C. Wada, P. Adler, N. Redding, D. Wade)
SESSION 30: Miscellaneous Topics Track
Project WET: Hands-On Educational Experience

Moderator - Joni Scharfenberg
National Project WET, Fairbanks, AK

Project WET is the premier national and international water education program that reaches thousands of teachers and children every year. Based on science, but understandable by all, the hands- on activities are multi- disciplinary incorporating math, literature, culture, history and economics and relate to everyone- from 5 to 95! Project WET has more than 70 coordinators in the U.S. and reaches many countries around the world. It is considered the world's best water education source. Project WET is currently engaged in a new program called America’s Water Future, which continues a mission that “envisions a world in which action oriented education enables every child to understand and value water, ensuring a sustainable future.” This session will present the important topics that AWRA's audience is engaged in by utilizing a fun, fantastic, interactive format that involves every attendee. Each attendee will leave with a new view of water and a collection of activities that can be used as icebreakers like 'A Drop in the Bucket' or 'Raining Cats and Dogs', to group coordination like '8 for 1- 1 for All' or full-fledged hands on explanations of most of the topics being presented at this 2017 conference. This will be an action packed 90-minutes that will offer short and simple educational activities for the classroom, outdoor activity, or the boardroom. There are more than ninety activities in the WET guide to choose from in addition to other books like 'Healthy Water, Healthy People, and 'Wonder of Wetlands'. Joni Scharfenberg is the Alaska coordinator for National Project WET and serves on the Project WET council. She is the overall project and staff coordinator and has worked for the Fairbanks Soil and Water Conservation District in Fairbanks, Alaska for 17 years.


Wednesday / Nov. 8 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

Moderator - Lauren Patterson
Duke University, Durham, NC

Topical Session: This session will focus on highlighting one of the primary findings and recommendations from the recent Aspen Data Dialogue report: INTERNET OF WATER: Sharing and Integrating Water Data for Sustainability. Water is a highly undervalued resource, water data even more so. As such, it is important for water data users to demonstrate the value of open and shared water data to meet current, ongoing water management. In this session, Jerad Bales will present on the value of open-source data services to support citizen monitoring; an upcoming potential source of water data. Levi Brekke will describe recent efforts by the Bureau of Reclamation to provide platforms for the private sector and general public to access water-related data in the hopes that value will be created from open data. Ryan Barr will talk about the data revolution in agriculture and how public data are leveraged, alongside with privately collected data, for decision-making. Biju George will present on the concept of a One Watershed Utility, which requires collecting and sharing a variety of real-time water data across a river basin to build flexible solutions to address runoff from high-intensity rain events.

Open-source Data Services to Support Citizen Monitoring - Jerad Bales, CUAHSI, Cambridge, MA, USA
Enhancing Private Sector and Citizen Access to Reclamation Water Information - Levi Brekke, Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO, USA (co-authors: A. Danner, B. Iversen, V. Mccann, J. Nagode, S. Poulton, J. Rocha, K. Tarbet)
The One Watershed Utility: Operating Watersheds like a Process Plant - Biju George, DC Water, Washington DC, DC, USA
PowerpointLeveraging Water Information in Agriculture - Ryan Barr, E&J Gallo Winery, Modesto, CA, USA

Moderator - Justin Iverson
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

A New Angle on Hillslope Drainage Modeling - Elizabeth Jachens, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA (co-authors: C. Roques, J. Selker)
Water Sharing and Depletion in a Transboundary Aquifer: Case Study of the Hueco Bolson - Zhuping Sheng, Texas A&M AgriLife, El Paso, TX, USA (co-authors: D. Zhang, J. Tracy, S. Abudu, K. Bushira, R. Sanchez, S. Ahn, P. Yang)
Optimization of Water Resources in Miami-Dade County, Florida - Ed Rectenwald, Stantec, Fort Myers, FL, USA (co-author: V. Walsh)
Different Stimulation Source at Field Tests to Delineate the Spatial Distributions of Hydraulic Properties - Jain-Wei Chen, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (co-authors: J. Chen, Y.Chen, H. Lin, S. Huang, T. J. Yeh, J. Wen)
Thermal Storage Zone Development, City of Kennewick Washington ASR Project - Dave Nazy, EA Engineering, Science, & Technology, Inc., PBC, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: P. Brown, L. Haas)

Moderator - Heejun Chang
Portland State University, Portland, OR

Topical Session: This session features changing flood risk under climate change scenarios in the lower Willamette River and will present the latest results of hydraulic modeling and flood vulnerability analysis.

An Assessment of Columbia and Willamette River Flood Stage on the Columbia Corridor Levee Systems at Portland, OR in a Future Climate - Susan Wherry, US Geological Survey, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: T. Wood, K. Duffy, R. Moritz)
Modeling Flood Risk in the Portland, OR, Metro Area - Lumas Helaire, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: S. Talke, H. Chang)
Collaborative flood modeling and risk analysis in the Lower Willamette River - Heejun Chang, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA (co-authors: S.Cho, H. Duong, L. Helaire, S.Talke, J. Caudill)

Moderator - Dave Christensen
Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA

Panelists:
Dave Christensen, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA - Overview
Jim Pacheco, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA - How We Set Instream Flows
Carrie Sessions, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA - Case Law History - How Did We Get Where We are At?
Dave Christensen, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA - Summary of 2017 Legislative Session

Under the Water Resources Act of 1971, administrative rules adopted by the State Department of Ecology create the same protections for instream flows as an appropriative water right. To date, instream flow rules have been adopted in 29 watersheds plus the mainstem of the Columbia River. A series of Washington State Supreme Court decisions has led to challenges in balancing protection for stream flows with water supply needs of growing communities. In the 2000 Postema decision, the Court ruled that no de minimus impairment to instream flows could be permitted, which implicated even domestic permit-exempt uses. Subsequent Supreme Court rulings include the Swinomish, Foster and Hirst decisions. Taken together, these decisions restrict land owners relying on a permit-exempt well in basins with instream flow rules from getting new building approvals, unless the impact on stream flow is mitigated. Specifically, the Hirst decision from October 2016 has affected thousands of rural landowners, creating uncertainty, hardship and political conflict that has been one of the most important issues in Washington's 2017 legislative session. We will review the legal framework and history, and discuss where things stand after the legislative session ends.

Moderator - Steven Sobieszczyk
US Geological Survey, Portland, OR

Panelists:
Steven Sobieszczyk, Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Portland OR
Janine Castro, Geomorphologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland OR
Allison Coffin, Professor, Washington State University, Vancouver WA
Karen McLeod, Biologist, COMPASS, Portland OR

Inevitably, every scientist needs to talk science with policymakers, the media, and the public. Join us for a panel discussion with expert science communicators and hear about techniques, experiences, tools, and resources every scientist will find useful. Professionals on the panel include practicing scientists from federal agencies and universities, and members of Science Talk (www.sciencetalk.org) and COMPASS (www.compassscicomm.org), two science communication organizations that help scientists make their research stand out. The panelists have decades of combined experience in public speaking, video production, media relations, congressional affairs, education, and social media engagement. Learn why effective communication of science matters to everyone. Discover the secrets that help decision makers get past the gobbledygook they often hear when scientists speak. Or better yet, learn how to not speak gobbledygook. Get your message heard…and understood. Come participate in the "Art of Good Science Communication" panel and walk away knowing how to be bold and speak clearly.


Wednesday / Nov. 8 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 36, 37, 38, 39, 40

Moderator - John Tracy
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

Evaluating Future Agricultural Water Needs Using Interdisciplinary Methods - Jennifer Johnson, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Boise, ID, USA (co-author: J. C. Tracy)
Monitoring Network in the Bi-State Watershed for Better Water Management - Brian Wolcott, Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council, Milton-Freewater, OR, USA (co-authors: S. Patten, T. Patten, L. Adams, T. Baker)
PowerpointThe Growing Importance of Soil Moisture Analytical Methods in the Local and Global Water Budgets. - Keith Bellingham, Stevens Water Monitoring Systems, Portland, OR, USA
Investigating Satellite-Based Soil Moisture for Calibration of a Distributed Hydrologic Model in Northeastern Iowa - Andrea Thorstensen, NOAA NWS NCRFC, Chanhassen, MN, USA (co-author: M. DeWeese)

Moderator - Kyle Juracek
US Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS

Topical Session: The U.S. Geological Survey's National Streamflow Network currently includes more than 8,000 active streamgages. The continuous streamflow data provided by the network is important for various research and management applications including infrastructure design, water-supply planning and management, flood frequency analysis, habitat evaluation, estimation of sediment and contaminant transport, and assessment of the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on natural streamflow regimes.

The U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow Information Network - Robert Mason, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA (co-authors: J. Fulford, D. Yeskis)
The USGS National Water Census: How Well Can We Quantify the Hydrologic Cycle? - William Farmer, US Geological Survey, Denver, CO, USA (co-authors: S. Saxe, J. E. Kiang, L. E. Hay)
Streamflow Alteration in Kansas: Assessment, Causes and Habitat Implications - Kyle Juracek, US Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS, USA (co-author: K. Eng)
Surface Water Interactions with Columbia River Basalt Group Aquifers in Fifteenmile Creek Watershed, Oregon - Jonathan La Marche, Oregon Water Resources Department, Bend, OR, USA (co-authors: J. Hackett, R. Wood)

Moderator - Michael E. Campana
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

An Application of the National Water Model to Drive the Local-Scale Flood Model - Youcan Feng, PNNL, Richland, WA, USA (co-authors: D. Judi, C. Rakowski)
Flood Situational Awareness: Going to the WELL - Cindy Rakowski, PNNL, Richland, WA, USA (co-authors: D. Judi, P. Royer, T. McPherson)
Snowpack Analysis of Version 1.1 and 1.2 of the National Water Model Using Remotely Sensed and In-Situ Observations for the Western United States with an Application in Ensemble Streamflow Prediction for the Colorado Department of Water Resources - Logan Karsten, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, USA (co-authors: D. Gochis, A. Dugger, J. McCreight, M. Barlage, T. Painter, J. Deems, M. Skiles, G. Fall, C. Olheiser)
Implementation and Evaluation of the NOAA National Water Model Using the Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System - David Gochis, NCAR, Boulder, CO, USA (co-authors: B. Cosgrove, A. Dugger, J. McCreight, L. Karsten, E. Clark, W. Yu, F. Salas, M. Barlage, K. Sampson, A. RafieeiNasab, L. Read, L. Pan, Y. Liu, Z. Cui, C. Phan, Y. Zhang, T. Graziano)

Moderator - Dave Christensen
Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA

Panelists:
Dave Christensen, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA - Overview
Kelsey Collins, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA - Water Banks in Washington Today
Dan Haller, Aspect Consulting, LLC, - Contrasting Water Banking to Other States
Mike Brady, Washington State University, WA - Economic Impacts of Water Restrictions and Banking Solutions
Dave Christensen, Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA - Recent Case Law and 2017 Legislative Session

As discussed in Part 1, finding approaches that protect stream flows and provide water supply options have challenged water managers in Washington State, especially in the last two decades. The conflicts have created measurable economic impacts to individual landowners and local communities. Policy makers across the west are looking for market reallocation tools to promote protection of instream flows and provide for out-of-stream uses. In Washington State, water banks are being established to mitigate impairment from new permit-exempt wells in four watersheds: the Yakima Basin (Kittitas County), Walla Walla Basin, Dungeness and Spokane basins. Each bank operates quite distinctly-costs, administrative structure and legal underpinnings. We will discuss each of these banks, look at other banking models, and consider environmental and social settings found in other states in an effort to improve water management through better use of market reallocation tools.

Moderator - Karen Trebitz
University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

PowerpointIntegrating Cultural Perspectives into International Interdisciplinary Work in Water Resources - Karen Trebitz, University of Idhao, Moscow, ID, USA (co-authors: S. J. Fennema , S.J. Keegan, K. Hicks, M. Quiroz Jara, J. I. A. Alarcon )
IPAs and H2O: How Craft Beer Brewers Can Best Communicate Their Water-Intensive Industry to Consumers - Coy Callison, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA (co-authors: N. Lee, T. Seltzer)
PowerpointDeveloping Meaningful Partnerships at Home and Abroad: The Importance of Networking, Communicating, and Volunteering - Sharon B. Megdal, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

Wednesday / Nov. 8 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 41, 42, 43, 44, 45

Moderator - David Gilbey
Aquatic Informatics, McMinnville, OR

The Watershed Connectivity Banquet: Do Citizen Scientists Have a Seat at the Table? - Alan Kolok, Nebraska Watershed Network, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA (co-authors: K. Herrmann, J. Ali, S. Bartelt Hunt)
Supporting Visualization and Analysis through Open Data: Development of an Open Data Process and Visualization Tool for the Colorado River Basin - Allison Danner, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Boulder City, NV, USA (co-authors: D. Bunk, R. Clayton, B. Kitt, P. Matuska, H. Nguyen-DeCorse)
PowerpointUse of Optimization and Data Visualization Tools in Water Resources Planning: Case Study of the Los Vaqueros Expansion Project - Thomas FitzHugh, Stantec, Bellevue, WA, USA (co-authors: E. Triana, S. Mauzy, N. Stewart)
PowerpointData Visualization of Environmental Time-Series: A Demonstration of an Interactive Poster and Information Portal - Richard Koehler, NOAA, Boulder, CO, USA

Moderator - Kyle Juracek
US Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS

Topical Session: The U.S. Geological Survey's National Streamflow Network currently includes more than 8,000 active streamgages. This session is part II of II, describing the research and management applications resulting from this network. These include infrastructure design, water-supply planning and management, flood frequency analysis, habitat evaluation, estimation of sediment and contaminant transport, and assessment of the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on natural streamflow regimes.

Geomorphic Applications of Streamgage Information - Kyle Juracek, US Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS, USA
Using Stream Gaging Information to Infer Long-Term Trends in Channel Change: An Example Application Documenting Climate-Driven Sediment Waves In a Large, Glacially-Influenced Basin of Washington State - Scott Anderson, US Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA, USA (co-author: C. Konrad)
Streamgaging During the Elwha River Dam-Removal Project: Informing Adaptive Management and Scientific Interpretations - Christopher Curran, US Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA, USA (co-authors: J. J. Duda, C. S. Magirl)
Assessing Geomorphic Change From Increasing Flood Frequency Using Stream Gage Data - Adam Benthem, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA (co-author: K. Skalak)

Moderator - Nawajish Noman
Esri, Redlands, CA

Enabling High Resolution Large Scale Hydraulic Modeling by Incorporating River Channel Bathymetry - Siddharth Saksena, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA (co-author: S. Dey, V. Merwade)
Dynamic Flood Forecast Mapping Using National Water Model - Nawajish Noman, Esri, Redlands, CA, USA (co-authors: D. Ding, D. Djokic, S. Kopp)
Evaluating the Impact of Land Use Change on Future Flood Risk - Siddharth Saksena, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA (co-authors: A. Rajib, V. Merwade. S. Dey)
Policy and Infrastructure for Flood Hazard and Floodplain Management - Samantha Hamlin, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA

Moderator - Christopher Goodell
WEST Consultants, Portland, OR

A Practical Comparison of 1D and 2D Hydraulic Modeling in HEC-RAS - Christopher Goodell, WEST Consultants, Portland, OR, USA (co-author: K. Denn)
Managing a California Reservoir During Dam Re-Construction, Flood, and Drought Using a GoldSim System Model - Rebecca Leonardson Pluche, San Francisco Water, Power and Sewer, San Francisco, CA, USA
Levee Breach Analysis in Everglades Protective Areas, Florida - Sheng Yue, SFWMD, West Palm Beach, FL, USA (co-author: M. Ansar)
PowerpointUnlocking the Value of Data to Assess the Impact of Changing Conditions on Reservoirs - Lauren Patterson, Nicholas Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA (co-author: M. Doyle)

Moderator - Teresa Thornton
Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach, FL

Methodologies for Educators to Facilitate Community-Based, Place-Based Water Research in Secondary Schools - Teresa Thornton, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Bach, FL, USA
PowerpointGlobalization of Water Resources: Examining Social Learning Using Serious Gaming - Fatima Taha, OSU/ IHE Delft/ UPEACE, Corvallis, OR, USA
PowerpointExperiential Water Resource Education; Tapping into Urban Watersheds and Local Expertise - Karen Trebitz, University of Idaho, Moscow Idaho (co-author: C. Cooper)

Wednesday / Nov. 8 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 46, 47, 48, 49, 50

Moderator - Michael E. Campana
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

Oxbridge Academy is a High School in West Palm Beach, Florida with a strong environmental science program led by Educator Teresa Thornton. Three students, Faith Maniti, Martina Cavard, and Robert Linck, will present their research in an adjudicated workshop, designed to provide feedback from industry professionals and generate discussion. Observers are welcome.

Fate and Transport Modeling of Chemical Contaminates Analyzed from Source Waters that Lead to Toxic Megablooms in the Saint Lucie Watershed of South Florida - Robert Linck, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach, FL, USA (co-authors: E. Mirkin, R. Dukor, T. E. Thornton)
Using a Local Political Action Project to Control Fishery-Generated Soft Plastic Debris on the Turtle Nesting Beaches of Florida's South-Eastern Coast - Faith Maniti, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach, FL, USA (co-author: T. E. Thornton)
Degradation of Water Quality Through the Use of Synthetic Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles and Oxybenzone: The Unfamiliarity of the General Public to Sunscreen Toxicity on Coral Reef Biotas - Martina Cavard, Oxbridge Academy, West Palm Beach, FL, USA (co-author: T. E. Thornton)

Moderator - Rich Marvin
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

Land Use Coverage and Change Impacts on Rainfall-Runoff and Sediment Modeling - Benjamin Lord, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA (co-authors: M. Eddy, S. Kovach, J. Cajka, J. Buckley)
Development of an Improved Modeling Framework for Simulating Nutrient Transport in Tile-Drained Watersheds - Katrin Bieger, Texas A&M AgriLife, Blackland Research & Extension Center, Temple, TX, USA (co-authors: R.T. Bailey, J. G. Arnold)
A Model Study of the Influence of Land Use/Land Cover Changes on Runoff Peaks and Dry Season Flows in Seasonal Tropics, Panama Canal Watershed - Yanyan Cheng, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA (co-authors: J. Zhu, F. Ogden)

Moderator - Heejun Chang
Portland State University, Portland, OR

Meteorologic, Hydrologic, and Geographic Characteristics of Large Floods in the Delaware River Basin - Christopher Woltemade, Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, PA, USA
Impacts of Ensemble Postprocessing on Forecast of Flooding Events over Mid-Atlantic Basins - Yu Zhang, UT Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA (co-author: Z. Cui)

Moderator - Julia Byrd
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

The Effects of Source Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs: A Review and Synthesis of Empirical Literature - James Price, US EPA, Cincinnati, OH, USA (co-author: M. T. Heberling)
Drinking Water Treatment Plant Costs and Source Water Quality: An Updated Case Study (2013-2016) - Matthew Heberling, US EPA, Cincinnati, OH, USA (co-authors: C.T. Nietch, J. I. Price, H. W. Thurston, M. Elovitz)
Forest Cover Impacts on Drinking Water Treatment Costs in the Non-Tidal Potomac Basin - Zachary Smith, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Rockville, MD, USA (co-authors: H. Moltz, K. Bencala, R. Mandel, J. Palmer, A. Nagel)
Tracking Water Quality Problems in The Dan River Using Sensory Analysis - Julia Byrd, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA (co-authors: K. Waggoner, D. Rahka, G. Boardman, A. Dietrich, D. Gallaagher)

Moderator - Joanna Endter-Wada
Utah State University, Logan, UT

The Role of Water Demand Management Infrastructure: Tapping New Potential and Assessing Tradeoffs - Joanna Endter-Wada, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA (co-authors: C. Carney, I. Thomson, D. Wuenschell, L. Welsh)
Demand Characteristics and Future Use of Colorado River Basin Streamflows - James Booker, Siena College, Loudonville, NY, USA
An Overview of the Oklahoma Water for 2060 Produced Water Working Group's Reuse and Recycling Study - David Lampert, Oklahoma State University, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Stillwater, OK, USA
PowerpointConfounding Conservatism in Utah: Strong Citizen Support for Government Involvement to Confront Water-Related Stresses in a Red State - Clint Carney, Utah State University, North Logan, UT, USA (co-author: J. Endter-Wada)

Thursday / Nov. 9 / 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Concurrent Sessions 51, 52, 53, 54, 55

Moderator - Joby M. Prince Czarnecki
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS

Using High-Resolution Terrestrial Lidar to Measure Stream Bank Erosion/Deposition - James McNair, Annis Water Resources Institute, Muskegon, MI, USA (co-author: K. J. Thompson)
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Structure From Motion Techniques and Their Use in Protecting Surface Water Quality - Joby M. Prince Czarnecki, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA (co-authors: L. A. Hathcock, J. J. Ramirez-Avila, A. C. Linhoss, T.J. Schauwecker)
A Global Assessment of Surface Water Response to Drought Surrounding Dams in Border Regions - Alan Devenish, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA
"Water-to-Cloud" Cyberphysical Sensing Network for Mapping and Monitoring River Water Quality Using Mobile Sensing Platforms - Srinivasa Rao Balivada and Priyank Hirani, both of the Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Kovvur, Andhra Pradesh, India (co-authors: S. Randhawa, R. Chauhan, S. Guha, G. B. Subramanyam, S. C. Vedala)
Satellites as a Water Pollution Sensor: Correlating High-Resolution In-Situ Sensing and Remote Sensing Data Sukanya Randhawa, IBM Research India, Bangalore, KA, India (co-authors: S. R. Balivada, R. B. Guruprasad, P. Hirani, S. Guha)

Moderator - Emmanuel Nzewi
Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX

Green (and Vegetated) Stormwater Infrastructure: Lessons Learned From Bioretention Design Research in Vermont - Stephanie Hurley, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA
PowerpointThe Borehole Permeameter Approach for Stormwater Infiltration Testing - J. Scott Kindred, Kindred Hydro, Inc., Mercer Island, WA, USA
Stormwater Capture Utilizing Green Stormwater Infrastructure in Los Angeles, California - K. Majid Sadeghi, City of Los Angeles - LASAN, LA, CA, USA (co-authors: S. Kharaghani, W. Tam, H. Loáiciga)
Designing Resilient Stormwater Drainage Infrastructure Under Climate Variation Conditions - Emmanuel Nzewi, Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX, USA (co-author: W. Guissou)

Moderator - William Battaglin
US Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO

Topical Session:
The focus of this session is on the occurrence (water, sediment, and tissue), fate, and effects of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in National Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and other protected and unprotected areas. Topics will include environmental occurrence of CECs in sensitive aquatic environments, uptake and accumulation in non-target organisms, modes of action, toxicity to aquatic organisms (including potential endocrine disruption as well as genotoxic and immunotoxic effects), and degradation of CECs.

Changes in Numbers, Concentrations, and Loads of Anthropogenic Bioactive Chemicals (ABC) in the Illinois Waterway Upstream and Downstream from the Bigheaded Carp Population Front - William Battaglin, US Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO, USA (co-authors: P.Terrio, J. Duncker, P. Bradley)
Target-Chemical Analysis and Biological Assays Illustrate Mixed-Organic-Contaminant Exposure and Effects in USA Streams - William Battaglin presenting for Paul Bradley, US Geological Survey, Columbia, SC, USA (co-author: D. Villeneuve)

Moderator - Noel Gollehon
U.S. Department of Agriculture – Natural Resources Conservation Service, Beltsville, MD

Environmental Accounting for the Urban Water System: Past, Present and Future - Sam Arden, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA (co-author: X. (Cissy) Ma)
Conceptual Diagrams of Ecosystem Services from Watershed Projects - Noel Gollehon, USDA-NRCS, Beltsville, MD, USA (co-author: G. Townsley)
A Coupled GIS Modeling Framework for Hydrologic Ecosystem Services - Feng Pan, UWM, Milwaukee, WI, USA (co-author: W. Choi)
Enhancing Benefits from Payments for Water-based Ecosystem Services by Accounting for Spillover Impacts - Mark Eiswerth, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO, USA (co-author: G. C. van Kooten)

Moderator - Kristopher Byrd
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

Using Smart Meters to Uncover Drivers of Water Use for Nonresidential Urban Irrigation - Kim Quesnel, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA (co-authors: N. Ajami, J. Urata, A. Marx)
PowerpointIrrigation System Maintenance: Enhancing Homeowner Skills - Diana Wuenschell, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA (co-authors: J. Endter-Wada, K. Kopp, S. Duer)
Oregon Rules Regarding Back-Siphon Prevention on Groundwater Irrigation Systems - Kristopher Byrd, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR, USA
Irrigation Conveyance Efficiency and Water Balance of the Little Wind Unit on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming - Ginger Page, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA (co-authors: S. Rosado, W. J. Gribb, S. N. Miller)

Thursday / Nov. 9 / 10:30 AM - 12:00 Noon
Concurrent Sessions 56, 57, 58, 59, 60

Moderator - David Powers
HR Wallingford, Houston, TX

Topical Session: Nature-based solutions refers to features that define or are representative of natural riverine and coastal landscapes and are either naturally occurring or engineered to mimic natural conditions. International interest is growing with respect to use of such features to mitigate flood risks to riverine and coastal communities, while providing ecosystem services. This special session presents some recent advances in thinking and practice to move this agenda forward.

Design Guidelines for Natural and Nature-Based Solutions - Todd Bridges, USACE, Vicksburg, MS, USA
Supporting the Application of Nature-Based Solutions to Rivers and Coasts in UK - David Powers, HR Wallingford, Houston, TX (co-authors: E . Rendle, M. Roca)

Moderator - Carlton Spirio
Florida Department of Transportation, Tallahassee, FL

Regional and Watershed 'Wise' Stormwater Management Strategies - Carlton Spirio, Florida Department of Transportation, Tallahassee, FL, USA
Improving Resilience & Livability with Green Infrastructure in Historic New Orleans - Jason Doll, Moffatt & Nichol, Raleigh, NC, USA
Modeling Innovation in Urban Water Systems - Mary Santelmann, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA (co-authors: D. Hulse, D. Conklin, B. Fulfrost, M. Harrison, M. Wright, R. Haggerty)
Are Rain Gardens Cost Effective for Urban Stormwater Management? Comparing Full Life Cycle Costs of Rain Garden and Deep Storage Tunnel in Shepherd Creek Watershed - Bayou Demeke, U.S. EPA, Cincinnati, OH, USA (co-authors: W. W. Ingwersen, D. Vineyard, W. Shuster)

Moderator - Paul Pickett
Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA

PowerpointCold Water Refuges and TMDLs: Improving the Links Between Water Quality and Salmon Protection - Paul Pickett, WA State Dept. of Ecology, Olympia, WA, USA
Application of 1D HEC-RAS and 2D CE-QUAL-W2 Hydrodynamics and Water Quality Models in Support of the Total Maximum Daily Load Development - Zhonglong Zhang, LimnoTech, US Army ERDC, Davis, CA, USA (co-author: B. Johnson)
Flexible TMDL and NPDES Permit Compliance Approaches in California - Andrew Fang, Kieser & Associates, LLC, Kalamazoo, MI, USA (co-authors: M. S. Kieser, J. A. Klang)
A Case Study of Spatiotemporal Variability in Stream Temperature Profiles and Contributing Landscape Characteristics in the Chehalis River, Washington - Whitney Vonada, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA

Moderator - Kenneth L. Stahr
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

Availability of Water in Old River, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, to Byron-Bethany Irrigation District during Drought Conditions - Ryan Thacher, Exponent, Pasadena, CA, USA (co-authors: Su. Paulsen, K. Marjanovic
PowerpointDetermining Surface Water Availability in Oregon: Program Overview and Updates - Jordan Beamer, Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR, USA (co-authors: K. Stahr, M. Hoskinson)
21st Century Management Solutions for Water Supply and Demand - Bill Szafranski, Lynker Technologies, Boulder, CO, USA (co-author: R. Wolvington)
PowerpointTacoma Water - Water Yield Supply and Demand Model (WYSDM) - Steven Thurin, HDR, Bellevue, WA, United States

Moderator - Keith Mills
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

Willamette River Basin Hydrologic Dam Safety Studies - Chris Bahner, WEST Consultants, Inc., Salem, OR, USA (co-author: A. Duren)
PowerpointDams - The Missed Risk in Plain Sight - Sandra Glenn, DeKalb County Department of Watershed Management, Decatur, GA, USA (co-author: S. A. Smith)
Ensemble Flow Forecasts for Risk Based Reservoir Operations of Lake Mendocino in Mendocino County, California - Chris Delaney, Sonoma County Water Agency, Santa Rosa, CA, USA (co-author: J. Mendoza)

Thursday / Nov. 9 / 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 61, 62, 63, 64, 65

Moderator - Karl Morgenstern
Eugene Water & Electric Board, Eugene, OR

Protecting Water Quality Using the Clean Ohio Fund - Jerome Iles, Ohio State University Extension, Lancaster, OH, USA
PowerpointLarge Scale Restoration of the Upper Basin of the St. Johns River: Benefits and Policy Implications - Ann B. Shortelle, St. Johns River Water Management District, Palatka, Fl, USA (co-authors: K. Hankin, D. Watt)
Urban Stream Restoration in the Bronx: Water Quality Improvement, Ecological Restoration in a Dense Urban Environment - Marit Larson, NYC Parks, New York, NY, USA
Water Quality Goals in Collision: CERCLA v CWA, aka: The Uncertain Case of Zinc in the Coeur d'Alene (Idaho) - Mark Solomon, Idaho Water Resources Research Institute, Moscow, ID, USA

Moderator - Walt Burt
GSI Water Solutions, Portland, OR

Continued Investigation of Groundwater / Surface Water Interaction in Columbia River Flood-Basalt Near Mosier, Oregon - Aurora Bouchier, OWRD, Salem, OR, USA (co-author: J. LaMarche)
Groundwater Resources of the Columbia River Basalt Group, Upper Umatilla Basin, Oregon - Esther Pischel, US Geological Survey, Portland, OR, USA (co-author: M. Gannett)
Aquifer-Test Results in the Columbia River Basalt Group, Umatilla Indian Reservation, Northeastern Oregon - Kate Ely, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR, USA
Using High-Frequency Groundwater Geochemical Sampling to Understand Flow-System Dynamics in the Lower Umatilla basin, Oregon - Henry Johnson, US Geological Survey, Portland, OR, USA

Moderator - Wade Peerman
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR

Variability, Antibiotic Sensitivity, and the Influence of Particle Size on E. coli in Eastern South Dakota's Streambed Sediment - Sadia Salam, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA (co-authors: R. McDaniel, B. Bleakley)
Evaluating E. coli Particle Attachment and the Impact on Transport During High Flows - Louis Amegbletor, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA (co-authors: R.McDaniel, B. Bleakley)
Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacteria Isolates in Woodchips Bioreactors and Their Transport to the Environment - Sara Mardani, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA (co-authors: R. McDaniel, B. Bleakley)
Modeling Removal of Fecal Indicator Bacteria by Enhanced Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) on a Watershed Scale - Jordyn Wolfand, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA (co-authors: C.Seller, Y. Myoung Cho, T. S. Hogue, R. G. Luthy)

Moderator - Derrick Holland
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX

PowerpointImproving Emergency Communications Using Maslow's Hierarchy - Nicki Pozos, Barney & Worth, Portland, OR, USA
Tweets and Hashtags: How Analyzing Online Water Discussion Can Direct Strategic Communication Efforts in Conservation - Coy Callison, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA (co-author: D. Holland)
Social and Political Influence - A Risk that Can be Managed - Stephanie White, HDR, Denver, CO, USA
What About Water?: How Online News Messages About Water Scarcity Impact Level of Concern and Environmental Behaviors - Derrick Holland, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA (co-author: K. Janét)

Moderator - Jeff Harris
WEST Consultants, Inc., Folcom, CA

The Big Sioux River Flood Model Project - Chris Lupo, RESPEC, Rapid City, SD, USA
Probable Maximum Flood Update for the Largest and Third-Largest US Army Corps of Engineers Dams using Gridded HEC-HMS Models - Jeff Harris, WEST Consultants, Inc., Folcom, CA, USA (co-authors: K. Denn, J. Melliger, M. Larsen)
Resilient Infrastructure Research Needs Assessment - Alison Witheridge, Water Research Foundation, Denver, CO, USA

Thursday / Nov. 9 / 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Concurrent Sessions 66, 67, 69, 70

Moderator - Mellony Hoskinson
Oregon Water Resources Department, Portland, OR

Oregon's Statewide Inter-Agency Water Monitoring Strategy - Aaron Borisenko, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Hillsboro, OR, USA and Mellony Hoskinson, Oregon Water Resources Department, Portland, OR (co-authors: A. Hatch, K. Fetcho, T. Frueh, J. Anthony, S. Marco, E. Hammond, J. Kagaan)
Oregon's Statewide Groundwater Quality Monitoring Program - Paige Evans, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, HIllsboro, OR, USA (co-author: K. Goodwin)
Advances in Automated Flow Monitoring using Tracer Methods - Gabe Sentlinger, Fathom Scientific Ltd., Bowen Island, BC, Canada (co-authors: A. Zimmerman, M. Richardson)

Moderator - Kim Ogren
Oregon Water Resources Dept., Salem, OR

Performance of Updated CLIGEN Precipitation Estimates and Their Impacts on Urban Runoff - Jingqiu Chen, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA (co-authors: M. W. Gitau, B. A. Engel, D. C. Flanagan)
Are Groundwater Management Districts in Oregon's Future? - Michael Campana, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA
SESSION 68: Future Risk Track
Panel: Emerging Policies of the New Federal Administration on Water Resources, Climate Research, and Resiliency
(AWRA Policy Committee)

Moderator Andrew Graham
HDR, Inc., Olympia, WA

Panelists:
Paul Freedman, President and CEO LimnoTech, Ann Arbor, MI
Jerad Bales, Executive Director, Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc., Arlington, MA
Tony Willardson, Executive Director, Western States Water Council, Murray, UT
Kathie Dello, Associate Director, Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

This panel will explore what we have seen so far from the new administration in Washington DC around funding and partnerships for water resources, with a particular focus on climate science and resiliency. We will hear from panelists representing federal, state and local government perspectives, and then engage in a conversation with audience participation. AWRA's Policy Committee will use the observations and questions arising from this discussion as it seeks to help the AWRA Board understand emerging federal policies affecting water resources, research and infrastructure.

Moderator - Drew Ackerman
Black and Veatch, Denver, CO

PowerpointWhere Drinking Water Meets Stormwater - Kimberly Swan, Clackamas River Water Providers, Oregon City, OR, USA
Where do Your Impairments Originate? - Drew Ackerman, Black and Veatch, Denver, CO, USA (co-author: J. Schlaman)
Water Stress, Water Salience, and the Implications for Water Supply Planning - Margaret Garcia, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA (co-author: S. Islam)
Socio-Economic Analysis for Integrated Water Resource Management - Case Study for the Rio Grande River Basin - Jad Ziolkowska, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA

Moderator - Keith Mills
Oregon Water Resources Department, Salem, OR

Improving Watershed Health through the Watershed Condition Framework: The Role of National Forest Lands - Kelly Mott Lacroix, U.S. Forest Service, Washington, DC, USA and Amy Jensen, U.S. Forest Service, Missoula MT (co-authors: M. Eberle, P. Luehring)
PowerpointUnited States Forest Service National Best Management Practices (BMP's) Program Implementation, Monitoring, and Results. - Michael Eberle, USDA - FS, Washington, DC, USA
Spatial and Temporal Variance of Macroinvertebrate Community Structure, Little Creek, Davenport CA - John Hardy, Cal Poly's Swanton Pacific Ranch, Davenport, CA, USA (co-author: Brian Dietterick)
The Effects of Impervious Cover on Streamflow under Various Watershed Conditions in the Potomac Basin - Zachary Smith, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Rockville, MD, USA (co-authors: H. Moltz, J. Palmer)
Southeastern Partnership for Forests & Water - Successes & Lessons Learned - Catherine (Kitty) Weisman, Southeastern Partnership for Forests and Water, Atlanta, GA, USA